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A new update to my actual, like, writing of stuff blog, Philip Sandifer: Writer

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taiey said: xkcd

I think it’s a strong contender for best comic strip currently running in print or digital. It’s adept at single strip gags, but it can also really spread its wings and do something big and bold, whether it be the structural experimentation of something like “Time” or the “here is a humorous infographic” approach that it often favors. It’s a strip that’s good at many things, but that never loses its own identity. 

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thealphapenguin said: Would something like the Virgin New Adventures have worked with a Doctor other than McCoy's? Alternatively, what would a line of original Doctor Who novels made as the official continuation of the series have been like if the series had been cancelled with an earlier incarnation?

I don’t think the NAs would have worked with a Doctor other than McCoy’s, but I’m not sure that’s anything other than a statement that the NAs were very much tied to the late 80s/early 90s, an era for which McCoy was as perfect a Doctor as McGann was for the late 90s/early 00s. Doctors, like any other part of the show, tend to be of their time.

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Anonymous said: Way back when, you said you stopped watching Being Human after series 3. Did you just lose interest or is there some West Wing-esque reason to stop after series 3?

There’s a lot of cast changes after Series 3, and knowing this just sort of left me unenthused about starting what was functionally going to be a new series with a similar premise. Series 4-5 got great reviews, so I probably should check them out, but the cast changes just kinda put me off.

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m-wesley said: I don't know if this is the right way to answer your question about what novel to cover in the Williams book, but speaking as someone likely to buy it, either might be interesting. Festival of Death is basically a traditionalist Graham Williams story with a Steven Moffatt-style time-travel story structure. From what I recall Tomb of Valdemar was less successful at what it attempted, but was trying for something weirder and less predictable.

I think I am leaning towards Festival, based on feedback.

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deathchrist2000 said: Well, it would appear that Keiron has given you another reason to care about Star Wars. Thoughts?

I think Kieron is right that it’s a book that’s solidly in his wheelhouse. 

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Anonymous said: Dirk Gently?

First novel’s always been a bit rough for me due to knowing the source material. I’ve always had a soft spot for Long Dark Teatime, however.

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philsandifer:

torisandifer:

Hey, philsandifer! Found a picture of the moment of all started

I’d like to stress that I was born in 1982, which makes the seventies tinge of this entire room terribly entertaining. 
But yes, that must be very early on, as I don’t have the joystick rotated correctly, and I know I learned that pretty early. (This is, to be clear, me at about the age of 3 or 4, on a Commodore 64, no doubt playing Dr. Seuss’s Fix Up the Mix-Up.)

Also, the awful chair print visible in the lower right? There was a matching armchair and sofa of that print - this awful bizarre material that they’d only make in the 1970s - a polyester velour that didn’t breathe at all, so that the sofa and chair were unbearable in any sort of heat. Though, as my parents were always quick to point out should anyone criticize them for their awful 70s sweat sofa, the sofa was great for naps.
In any case, those suckers survived for decades. The sofa was in the basement where I first watched Doctor Who, and was set a few feet in front of a bookcase, so there was actually some decent playspace right behind it, making me one of a handful of people who actually did watch chunks of Doctor Who from behind a sofa, albeit not because it was scary so much as because I got bored during a lot of Pertwee stuff and went to go play with other toys while I watched. 
The sofa finally migrated to Chicago with me and to my first apartment, when I did my Masters, where it lasted about six months before being junked in favor of new furniture the first time someone gave us a decent chunk of money as a present. Actually, it was given away to some quasi-friends I’ve not spoken to in a decade now, and for all I know may haunt the world still. I’m not sure a sofa like that can ever truly die. 

philsandifer:

torisandifer:

Hey, philsandifer! Found a picture of the moment of all started

I’d like to stress that I was born in 1982, which makes the seventies tinge of this entire room terribly entertaining. 

But yes, that must be very early on, as I don’t have the joystick rotated correctly, and I know I learned that pretty early. (This is, to be clear, me at about the age of 3 or 4, on a Commodore 64, no doubt playing Dr. Seuss’s Fix Up the Mix-Up.)

Also, the awful chair print visible in the lower right? There was a matching armchair and sofa of that print - this awful bizarre material that they’d only make in the 1970s - a polyester velour that didn’t breathe at all, so that the sofa and chair were unbearable in any sort of heat. Though, as my parents were always quick to point out should anyone criticize them for their awful 70s sweat sofa, the sofa was great for naps.

In any case, those suckers survived for decades. The sofa was in the basement where I first watched Doctor Who, and was set a few feet in front of a bookcase, so there was actually some decent playspace right behind it, making me one of a handful of people who actually did watch chunks of Doctor Who from behind a sofa, albeit not because it was scary so much as because I got bored during a lot of Pertwee stuff and went to go play with other toys while I watched. 

The sofa finally migrated to Chicago with me and to my first apartment, when I did my Masters, where it lasted about six months before being junked in favor of new furniture the first time someone gave us a decent chunk of money as a present. Actually, it was given away to some quasi-friends I’ve not spoken to in a decade now, and for all I know may haunt the world still. I’m not sure a sofa like that can ever truly die. 

Photo
torisandifer:

Hey, philsandifer! Found a picture of the moment of all started

I’d like to stress that I was born in 1982, which makes the seventies tinge of this entire room terribly entertaining. 
But yes, that must be very early on, as I don’t have the joystick rotated correctly, and I know I learned that pretty early. (This is, to be clear, me at about the age of 3 or 4, on a Commodore 64, no doubt playing Dr. Seuss’s Fix Up the Mix-Up.)

torisandifer:

Hey, philsandifer! Found a picture of the moment of all started

I’d like to stress that I was born in 1982, which makes the seventies tinge of this entire room terribly entertaining. 

But yes, that must be very early on, as I don’t have the joystick rotated correctly, and I know I learned that pretty early. (This is, to be clear, me at about the age of 3 or 4, on a Commodore 64, no doubt playing Dr. Seuss’s Fix Up the Mix-Up.)

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Every once in a while, when researching Last War in Albion, there’s this unnerving feeling that Alan Moore is right about the American comics industry, and that the only sane man in comics worships a snake.